LinkedIn and First Impressions

Steve Gutzman

By Steve Gutzman, ICN

If you’re a Millennial, you’ve no doubt had the parental talk about being careful with what you put on your Facebook page. After all, colleges and companies routinely include this as part of their admission screening, and one odd entry may give the wrong impression. And with online fraud costing banks and insurance companies a fortune, they too are analyzing people’s online behavior. If you post an entry for public consumption that says you’re on your way to Barbados for a much-needed two-week vacation and are burglarized the next day, do you have a claim?

On the business side of the fence there’s LinkedIn – the de facto social media page for business. Any “parental advice” needed here? Surely this group is meticulously prudent about what they post. Unfortunately, despite plenty of articles written about “social selling,” most dismiss it as a passing fad — for what else could explain why a “star” salesperson for an elite enterprise software vendor would feature a margarita in their profile picture?

The VP of sales of a software company recently shared with his sales team one of those mysterious “industry statistics,” claiming that 70 percent of their customers/prospects look at their profiles on LinkedIn. The only thing surprising about this comment is that the number is not closer to 100 percent. Why wouldn’t a buyer want to know as much as possible about the person hovering over them with a contract and pen? A little bit of research could serve up a welcoming icebreaker like this: “It appears that you have been with five software companies in the last eight years – tell me again why I should make a five-year commitment to you.”

Which begs the question: “What does your profile say about you if you are in sales?” Does it say you love your company, or does it say you’re looking for your next job? Does it say you’ve helped your clients achieve their goals, or does it say you’re a great closer? Does it say you’re a good listener and never presume to know all the answers, or does it say you’ve attended 10 straight 100-percent clubs?

The sales law of first impressions of the face-to-face kind states that you are probably not going to close a six-figure sale in under 90 seconds — but you can sure lose one. First impressions of the online kind can be just as discriminating.

Steve Gutzman is a senior advisor at ICN and a 32-year veteran of the high-tech industry. You may contact him at sgutzman@dobetterdeals.com.

http://DoBetterDeals.com

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